EMG/diagnostic ultrasound

What is neuromuscular ultrasound?

Joint and muscle pain are complaints that many patients suffer from on a daily basis. It is important to find the real source of the symptoms, so you can make the proper diagnosis and prescribe the right treatment.

X-Rays, CT Scans and MRI’s have been for the longest time the tests to evaluate musculoskeletal problems.

Recent advances in sonar and ultrasound technology have created a more functional and practical approach to evaluate joints, muscles, ligaments and even nerves. This technology is called musculoskeletal ultrasound.

Clinical evidence and research support using ultrasound as the first diagnostic test for numerous musculoskeletal conditions. Diagnostic ultrasound offers a number of important advantages compared to X-Ray, CT and MRI, in terms of safety and effectiveness. Musculoskeletal ultrasound simply uses sonic waves, and there is no exposure to radiation.

At the same time, diagnostic ultrasound is noninvasive and offers real-time imaging, allowing for examinations of structures at rest and in motion. This ability to capture the movement of musculoskeletal components, differentiates it from other imaging modalities, and can permit more accurate diagnoses.

EMG STANDS FOR ELECTROMYOGRAPHY AND NCS STANDS FOR NERVE CONDUCTION STUDIES

The test consists of two parts:

1. An Electromyogram (EMG) measures the electrical activity of muscles at rest and during contraction. Nerves control the muscles in the body by electrical signals (impulses), and these impulses cause the muscles to react in specific ways. Nerve and muscle disorders cause the muscles to react in abnormal ways. During an Electromyography study, a very small pin is inserted in the muscle that helps us evaluate the condition of your muscles.

2. Nerve Conduction Studies (NCS) are used to measure the health of your nerves. Mild electrical stimulation is administered to the skin directly overlaying the nerve. The response is measured by a second set of electrodes applied to the surface of the skin. This impulse produces a visual signal on a computer monitor and when analyzed it can provide information about the condition of the nerve.